Comments

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 2, Problem 25

By mafiadx83 on Sat, 05/28/2016 - 08:31

how did you know that inital velocity is zero why not the final is zero ?

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 05/28/2016 - 21:51

Hi mafiadx83, thanks for the question. The scenario in this problem is that a pitcher is throwing a baseball. In that scenario, the ball begins at rest in the pitcher's hand, and then they throw their arm forward to throw the ball. The problem says to assume that their throwing action takes place over a distance of $3.5 \textrm{ m}$. The final velocity of the ball is whatever velocity with which it leaves their hand at the end of the pitching action, and the problem tells us this is $43 \textrm{ m/s}$. That's how we make our assumptions, and the videos explains how to get the acceleration given the information provided, but please let me know if it isn't clear.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 1, Problem 15

By kingrhino on Mon, 05/16/2016 - 03:48

Is part A a mistake? It asked for 93 million miles in meters. I would think that it would be rounded to 1.5 x10^11 meters

By Mr. Dychko on Mon, 05/16/2016 - 20:04

Hi kingrhino, yes, you're quite right that it does ask for meters. I've updated the quick answer and made a note about the mistake in the video. Thanks for the sharp eye.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 8, Problem 18

By carolsilber on Wed, 05/04/2016 - 17:55

wouldnt it be 3.0x10^5 because the answer is 30,000

By Mr. Dychko on Mon, 05/09/2016 - 22:25

Hi carolsilber, thanks for asking. $30,000$ is written as $3.0 \times 10^4$, so it doesn't look like there's any problem here. Let me know if you suspect any other errors though.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 8, Problem 7

By daniel.weiss1 on Wed, 05/04/2016 - 07:22

For part b, how do we know were are looking for the radial acceleration and not the tangential acceleration?
Thanks

By Mr. Dychko on Mon, 05/09/2016 - 22:20

Hi daniel.weiss1, thanks for the question. Since the grinding wheel is rotating with a constant angular velocity (2200 rpm) this means there is no tangential acceleration of any point on the edge of the wheel. Points on the edge (or anywhere since there's nothing special about the edge) are all going at a constant speed, in other words. The direction of their velocity is changing, despite the constant speed, and it's the radial acceleration which causes this change in direction.

Hope that helps,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 4, Problem 40

By mafiadx83 on Sat, 04/30/2016 - 06:49

why friction force equal mass * acceleration ?

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/30/2016 - 21:20

Hi mafiadx83, the rule for all force questions (and this rule goes by the name Newton's Second Law) is that net force equals mass * acceleration. In this particular question there is only one force, namely friction, and for this reason the net force is made up only of the friction force. Since the friction force is the net force in this particular question, that's why friction force equals mass * acceleration for this particular question.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 4, Problem 29

By mafiadx83 on Fri, 04/29/2016 - 10:45

why initial velocity equal zero ? is it suppose that final velocity equal zero because he is saying in the question what speed did the sprinter leave the starting block

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/30/2016 - 21:16

Hi mafeadx83, yes, that's right. It's just implied that the sprinter is initially at rest on the starting block, and the question is asking for the speed with which the sprinter launches off the starting block after applying a force.

Best wishes,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 20, Problem 31

By merkinthedark on Mon, 04/25/2016 - 13:39

can you check your calculations because I get my answer in the order of 5.0437x10^-7

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/30/2016 - 21:13

Hi merkinthedark, I ran the final numbers shown in the video through the calculator again and confirmed the answer, so please let me know if you find any specific error. It looks fine so far.

Best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 6, Problem 10

By mikepeter on Sun, 04/24/2016 - 15:23

why does friction force opposite to the applied force?
In question 8 , applied force and friction force are in the same direction /
can you please elaborate this difference?

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/30/2016 - 21:07

Hi mikepeter, thanks for the good question. A sliding friction force is always opposes motion. Sliding friction slows things down. This means the direction of a sliding friction force is in the opposite direction as the direction of motion. The direction of the applied force in problem 8, or here in problem 10, actually doesn't matter at all. It's only the direction of motion that matters in determining the direction of the sliding friction force.

All the best with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 19, Problem 34

By bmuniz8219 on Fri, 04/15/2016 - 14:16

Hi i have a quick question. If I1 points towards the left how does it in include 12OHMs

By Mr. Dychko on Fri, 04/22/2016 - 20:20

Hi bmuniz8219, that's a good question. Each current "starts" at a junction. While the diagram draws $I_1$ to the left along the very top, it's understood (even though not explicitly drawn) that the current originates at the junction below the $12\Omega$ resistor where the $I_2$ and $I_3$ currents also meet. So $I_1$ initially goes up through the $12\Omega$ resistor, and THEN, left along the top.

All the best with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 6, Problem 29

By hsumal on Wed, 04/13/2016 - 22:37

*Work-Energy Theorem

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 6, Problem 29

By hsumal on Wed, 04/13/2016 - 22:33

Why can't we use the conservation of energy law here? Wext= Change in KE + Change in PE + Ethermal where we can take everything as the system so that no external work is done and Etherm is zero.

By Mr. Dychko on Fri, 04/22/2016 - 22:30

Hi hsumail, thanks for the question, and apologies for taking so long to get back. Conservation of energy is being used here, though it could be expressed as the work-energy theorem as well and get the same result. The idea is that the total energy before a process is the same as the total energy after the process, and the formulae surrounding this subject serve just to help account for all the different forms of energy before and after the processes. Conservation of energy problems are book-keeping exercises.

Now I'll get to your comment. You mentioned the work-energy theorem, so let's clarify that it's $W_{ext} = \Delta KE$, not the expression written in your comment. [edit: earlier comments about the Earth don't apply. I hadn't actually looked up the problem.] You could consider the car-spring as a single system, which is all well and good, but this isn't strategic for problem solving since your only conclusion would be that $W_{ext} = 0$. This problem is asking for the spring constant, and conservation of energy is the ticket to solving for it. Maybe you would prefer the following expression, rather than the one I wrote in the video:
$KE_1 + PE_1 + W_{NC} = KE_2 + PE_2$. $W_{NC}$ typically represents friction, which is zero in this case, so we plug different types of energy into this expression and get $\dfrac{1}{2}mv_i^2 + 0 + 0 = 0 + \dfrac{1}{2}kx^2$ where I've substituted specific expressions in the same order as the equation before that has more generic expressions. This will arrive at $\dfrac{1}{2}mv_i^2 = \dfrac{1}{2}kx^2$, which is the same as in the video.

Hope this helps,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 11, Problem 8

By johncondon101 on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 15:49

Thanks a lot

By Mr. Dychko on Mon, 04/11/2016 - 18:57

My pleasure. You're welcome.

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 22, Problem 31

By jaclynrgile on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 06:13

roynunez273 is correct about B, however I took a different approach to the answer and ended up getting it right. Need to remove pi from your calculation:

So, F=PA= (7.3479x10^-7 N/m^2) (1.0x10^-4) should give you the correct answer.

By Mr. Dychko on Sun, 04/10/2016 - 20:44

Hi jaclynrgile, thanks for jumping in. I love the discussion this solution is making. In order to duplicate the answer in the back of the text, both you and roynunez273 are correct that you need to multiply the radiation pressure by a figure tip area approximated as $1.0 \textrm{ cm}^2$. Since part B is an estimate, and the figure tip area isn't specified, this creates some room for interpretation. While it's fine to estimate the finger tip area as $1.0 \textrm{ cm}^2$, as the text does, it's also OK to estimate a finger tip radius as $1.0 \textrm{ cm}^2$ and then calculate the area using $\pi r^2$, because who's finger tip is it? Each student, looking at their own finger tips, should get slightly different answers, and the only important point is that the estimate really is something close to the area of a finger tip.

Best wishes,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 11, Problem 8

By johncondon101 on Fri, 04/08/2016 - 17:05

in number 5 it was f2/f1, why is this problem f1/f2? How do you tell which way to do it, or is it arbitrary?

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/09/2016 - 20:10

Hi johncondon101, thanks for the question. The choice is kind of strategic. Either way will lead to the answer, but the algebra just looks a little tidier one way vs. the other, and the choice is more a matter of intuition. In problem #5 it made sense to have $f_2$ in the numerator since it was the unknown, and we ended up multiplying by the denominator ($f_1$ in that case) to isolate $f_2$ on one side of the equation. In this problem it's a bit less clear which choice to make, but since $m$ is the unknown and it will appear in both the numerator and denominator (eventually, after a couple of steps, which is why, again, setting things up in this case is more a matter of intuition), it's better to have it by itself in the denominator instead of adding to a term since we'll be multiplying by the denominator, and it's easier to multiply by a single factor.

Again, there's nothing much really here to worry about, it's just that one way might lead to neater work than the other. Either way gets to the answer after some algebra.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 19, Problem 32

By merkinthedark on Wed, 04/06/2016 - 13:02

If in the previous problem we discovered that currents I1 and I2 go to the left then why is the junction rule applied so that I1= I2+I3? Is it not I3=I1+I2?

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 04/06/2016 - 21:09

Hi merkinthedark, thanks for the question. Yes, we could have used knowledge from problem 31 to choose $I_2$ to the left, and this would be fine, but we don't have to do that. There's no particular reason why I didn't. It isn't important to be correct with the initial guess about the current direction. One just has to make a choice and then construct the equations accordingly. You'll notice that the final answer in this problem has $I_2$ going to the left after all, as we expect from our work in problem 31, so we arrive at the correct answer despite using an initial guess in the other direction.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 22, Problem 31

By roynunez273 on Sun, 04/03/2016 - 20:00

I think part B is wrong. We are given the area of the finger. All we have to do is just convert the area from cm^2 to m^2

By Mr. Dychko on Sun, 04/03/2016 - 22:25

Hi roynunez273, thanks for the comment. In part B we're calculating force by multiplying pressure by the area of the finger tip. The finger tip area is $\pi r^2$, and we're estimating the radius to be $1 \times 10^{-2} \textrm{ m}$, which is already in meters so that no conversion is necessary. When we multiply the pressure by that area we get the force shown in the solution, so please just let me know if I'm missing something, and please be specific.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 16, Problem 5

By dennis.colon.jr on Thu, 03/31/2016 - 07:53

I got 1.708x10^-55

By Mr. Dychko on Sat, 04/02/2016 - 20:29

Hi dennis.colon.jr, thanks for the comment. I can't see where the mistake is to arrive at the $1.7 \times 10^{-55}$ figure, but I've doubled checked that the answer I've provided is correct. If you have a more specific question about the solution, just let me know.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 16, Problem 11

By moonpen on Wed, 03/23/2016 - 11:47

when calculating the Force of 2, why isn't the force from 2 to 1 negative?

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 03/23/2016 - 19:46

Hi moopen, thanks for the question. When calculating the net force on charge 2 we're interested only in forces exerted on charge 2. The charge 1 is exerting a force to the right on charge 2, so that force is taken as positive. It's true that charge 2 exerts a force to the left on charge 1 (this is the Newton's 3rd Law counterpart to the force exerted on charge 2 by charge 1), but this force isn't relevant since it isn't exerted on charge 2.

Hope that helps,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 6, Problem 29

By daniel.weiss1 on Mon, 03/21/2016 - 18:43

Did a decimal place get lost in the answer for problem a? I believe that the answer is 9.06 x 10^5 for both a and b

By Mr. Dychko on Mon, 03/21/2016 - 21:37

Hi daniel, yes indeed, thank you for spotting that missing decimal. I have updated the quick answer.

Best wishes with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 2, Problem 47

By elizabeth on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 13:22

For b), shouldn't the answer be negative as the direction of the velocity is downwards? Thank you.

By Mr. Dychko on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 17:00

Hi elizabeth, since the question is asking for speed, the answer will always be positive since speed is the magnitude of the velocity. Put in other words, speed doesn't care about direction, it's always a positive number.

Best wishes,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 6th Edition, Chapter 2, Problem 41

By elizabeth on Thu, 03/17/2016 - 22:02

How can the final velocity be equal to both the positive and negative initial velocity? Shouldn't the final velocity be only equal to the negative initial velocity due to direction? Thank you.

By Mr. Dychko on Fri, 03/18/2016 - 16:54

Hi elizabeth, thanks for the question. The formula $v_f^2 = v_i^2 + 2ad$ is more generic than you're imagining. I think what you have in mind is that $v_f = -v_i$ at the time when the ball has returned to the thrower's hand, and that's true. But this formula works for all times when displacement is zero ($d=0$), and there's one other time when that's the case, namely, in the beginning! This "in the beginning" solution is kind of trivial since it's so obvious that the final velocity after basically no time has elapsed is the same as the initial velocity. This is what the solution $v_f = +v_i$ is telling us, that there is a moment when the final velocity is equal to the positive of the initial velocity, and it's our job to make the physical interpretation of that mathematical solution to understand that it's referring to the moment when the ball is launched. The formula gives all solutions when the displacement is zero, and there are two moments when that's the case: initial launch, and the much later return to the hand.

Hope that helps,
Mr. Dychko

7th Edition is complete

By hoga0114 on Sun, 03/13/2016 - 17:29

*Dychko

7th Edition is complete

By hoga0114 on Sun, 03/13/2016 - 17:28

Hi Mr. Dychoko,

Do you plan to add the MisConceptual questions? I think it would be really useful, and I can't find those answers anywhere. Thanks!

Anna

By Mr. Dychko on Sun, 03/13/2016 - 20:30

Hi Anna,

Thanks for the question. That's a pretty common one, but it would be very time consuming to also cover the MisConceptual Questions, so I'm sticking just to the regular Problems, which I hope meets most of the needs of most of the students.

Best wishes with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 7, Problem 51

By celloplayer091 on Thu, 03/10/2016 - 18:49

Why did you not multiply three times 65 for the three passengers?

By Mr. Dychko on Thu, 03/10/2016 - 23:09

Hi celloplayer091, thanks for the question. There is a factor of $3$, because of the 3 rear seat passengers, multiplying by their distance from the front of the car (3.90m), and then a factor $2$ multiplying by the distance to the two front seat occupants (2.80m). It sounds like you were expecting the factors of $3$ and $2$ to multiply by masses instead of distances, and that would work fine if you didn't "factor out" the $m_p$. For example, we could re-write the second line of algebra as $x_{cm} = \dfrac{m_cx_c + 2m_px_F + 3m_px_B}{m_c + 5m_p}$, and this would be the same as the version shown in the video with the $m_p$ factored out.

Hopefully that helps,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 19, Problem 29

By chuy4espindola4 on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 08:51

How does the -2.5263 I3 added to the -1.4118 I3 equal 4.981 I3? Should it not be 3.981 I3?

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 20:47

Hi chuy4espindola4, that's a good question. Another student also asked about that step, and here was my reply: https://www.giancolianswers.com/giancoli-physics-7th-edition-solutions/c.... Please just ask further if something there isn't clear.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 8, Problem 43

By coolkiddonald101 on Tue, 03/08/2016 - 12:56

please explain why you have (1/3)

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 20:43

Hi coolkiddonald101, thanks for getting in touch. In order to find the moment of inertia of the helicopter rotor we need to use one of the formulas in Figure 8-20 on pg. 210 which gives a list of formulas for different shapes and positions of the axis of rotation. The question tells us to treat each blade as a rod with an axis of rotation at the end (the end in this case being the center of the rotor where it connects to the axel that goes to the motor). The moment of inertia formula for a rod with an axis of rotation at the end is $\dfrac{1}{3}ML^2$, so that's where the $\dfrac{1}{3}$ comes from: it's part of the appropriate formula. If you're asking why that formula has the $\dfrac{1}{3}$, then don't worry about it since it's a non-obvious result of using calculus, which is beyond the scope of a course in algebraic physics.

Best wishes with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 16, Problem 4

By joseotilio25 on Sun, 02/28/2016 - 09:28

how I know the values of q1 and q2 because they dont mention in the exercice

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 03/09/2016 - 20:33

Hi joseotillio25, thanks for the question. Since the problem says we're working with protons, that means the charge on each is the elementary charge of $1.6 \times 10^{-19} \textrm{ C}$.

All the best,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 16, Problem 14

By merkinthedark on Wed, 02/24/2016 - 15:15

at the mark of 4:23 should it be R12^2+R23^2=R13^2? which would still come out to 2R12^2 but it did confuse me.

By Mr. Dychko on Wed, 02/24/2016 - 21:08

Hi merkinthedark,

Thanks for spotting that. Yes, you're quite right that there's a small error in the subscripts, and it should be $r_{12}^2 + r_{23}^2 = r_{13}^2$. I've made a note in the quick answer for other students.

All the best with your studies,
Mr. Dychko

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 7, Problem 39

By grjoav on Sun, 02/21/2016 - 16:44

I have also noticed that this answer is incorrect from the book's answer key section. The given information does not seem to add up to Giancoli's question #39, I believe this may be a completely different question. I am using the seventh edition book and I believe it is not the "Global Edition", although the other questions have been correct so far.

By Mr. Dychko on Sun, 02/21/2016 - 22:15

Hi grjoav, thanks for the comment. In the Global Edition, Chap. 7 #39 is about a baseball hitting a brick, whereas in the regular 7th Edition Chap. 7 #39 is about two cars colliding, as covered in the video. What is the difference you're finding between what's in your text versus what's covered in the video?

Giancoli 7th Edition, Chapter 24, Problem 4

By jiwook.kim on Fri, 02/19/2016 - 23:57

its .62mm